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4-1: Student Learning and Instructional Activities

Page history last edited by eLearning 10 years, 3 months ago

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                          The student will read and comprehend a variety of literary texts in print and nonprint formats.

The Simple Four

Student Learning

Instructional Activities and Strategies

PLAN: Planning means the students are engaging the topic or assignment and deciding what they want to know about the topic and/or the information they need for their assignment.

 

Students will ask themselves:

  • What do I need to do?
  • What's my assignment: What's my research topic?
  • What information do I need to answer my question? What information do I need for my research topic?
  • Plan strategies and follow an inquiry-based process in seeking knowledge in curricular subjects and make the real-world connection for using this process in one’s personal life. (1.1.1) (3.a)
  • Identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. (4.a)
  • Read widely and fluently to make connections with self, the world, and previous reading. (4.1.2)
  • Apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information by planning strategies to guide inquiry (3.a)
  • Analyze literary texts to draw conclusions and make inferences. (4-1.1)
  • Distinguish between first-person and third-person points of view. (4-1.2)
  • Carry out independent reading for extended periods of time to derive pleasure. (4-1.8)
  • Analyze the beginning of the story to identify the author's craft (e.g., word choide, sentence structure, figuartive language).
     

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ACT: As students ACT on their plan, they must prioritize their list of possible sources of information, find those resources, engage the resources to extract the relevant information and then evaluate the information for credibility, authority, and relationship to the topic or assignment.)

 

Students ask themselves such questions as:

  • Where can I find the information I need to answer my question or for my research topic?
  • Which information source(s) will be the most helpful in answering my question? Which information source(s) will be the most helpful for my research topic?
  • What search strategy will work best for each information source (e.g., book, online encyclopedia, web site)?
  • Now that I’ve found some information what do I do with it?
  • How do I decide what I need from everything I’ve found? 
  • Find, evaluate, and select appropriate information sources and digital tools to answer questions and accomplish specific tasks by recognizing that resources are created for a variety of purposes, including propaganda (e.g., pop-up ads, spam). (1.1.4) (3.c) (4.3.2) (IS 2.3) (IS 2.4)
  • Use critical thinking when evaluating information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context. (1.1.5) (1.2.2) (IS 2.1)
  • Read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning. (1.1.6)
  • Seek information for personal learning through multiple resources in a variety of formats and genres. (4.1.4) (4.2.1)
  •  
  • Distinguish between first-person and third-person points of view. (4-1.2)
  • Exemplify devices of figurative language (including simile, metaphor, personification, and hyperbole) and sound devices (including onomatopoeia and alliteration). (4-1.3)
  • Understand characterization and its impact on conflict as the basis of plot. (4.1-4)
  • Understand the effect of an author’s craft—such as word choice, sentence structure, the use of figurative language, and the use of dialogue—on the meaning of literary texts. (4-1.5)
  • Demonstrate understanding of the effect of a favorit author's craft by writing the beginning of a story in the author's style.
  • Classify works of fiction (including fables, tall tales, and folktales) and works of nonfiction (including biographies and personal essays) by characteristics. (4-1.8)
  • Recognize the characteristics of poetry (including stanza, rhyme, and repetition). (4-1.9)
  • Create an outline or storyboard of the literary text.
   

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ORGANIZE: When students ORGANIZE their information, they are making decisions about that information and their assignment or research topic. During this phase, students will write their report, create their multimedia presentation, complete the assignment, and submit their work. During this phase students must demonstrate what they learned.
 
Students should ask themselves such questions as:
  • How can I put my information together to show that I answered my question?
  • How can I show what I learned?
  • How do I document all the information sources I used?
  • Respond to literature and creative expressions of ideas in various formats and genres. (4.1.3) 
  • Create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for example, writing, creative dramatics, and the visual and performing arts). (4-1.7) 
  • Create bookmarks, podcasts, blog entries, booktalks about what has been read.
  • Record a podcast of the opening of the original story. Share with friends who will continue the podcast adding to the story.
  • Write an Accelerated Reader/Reading Counts test, create a Jeopardy! game, or other game format for the literary text.
  • Use a comic generator program such as Comic Life or Pixton for Schools (a free online comic generator) to create a graphic novel companion to the literary text.
   

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REFLECT: When students REFLECT on their work, they are evaluating their product as well as their research process. During this phase, students’ work may be submitted for peer review. Also during this phase, the teacher and/or library media specialist will reflect on the students’ work and using a grading rubric, evaluate the students’ work for assigning a grade.
 
Students should ask themselves such questions as:
  • How will I know if I answered my question?
  • How will I know if I did my job well?
  • Identify own areas of interest. (4.4.1) 
  • Recognize how to focus efforts in personal learning. (4.4.3)
  • Evaluate own ability to select resources that are engaging and appropriate for personal interests and needs. (4.4.6)
  • Write original similes, metaphors, hyperboles, and personifications.
  • Define onomatopoeia and alliteration.
  • Engage in self-selected reading.
  • Evaluate original works that are responses to literary texts.
   

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